Education

I recently had a disappointingly familiar experience. I was referred to a group CBT course – not group therapy, but more of a series of small group lectures to learn some techniques and exercises.

After a few of the weekly sessions, a recognisable feeling started to creep over me. The content was interesting enough, and the course was not run particularly badly. But I absolutely knew that it was not providing anything for me. I could learn the information much more efficiently, quickly, and enjoyably, if I was at home alone and not in the lecture itself.

I suppose a lot of NT people find it helpful to learn in groups. At the CBT course, the other participants seemed to enjoy telling and listening to stories and ideas from each other. But all I could think when they were talking was “When do we get back to the point? I’m not learning from this.”

This is an experience I have had repeatedly throughout education of all kinds. Initially, I can see the appeal of interacting with people who have similar interests, and of being able to directly interact with the educators themselves. But that appeal is extremely short-lived and soon runs dry when I’m faced with the exertion required to keep it up.

I have to push myself to go out, travel to wherever it’s happening, find my way into the right room to settle in, interact with my fellow learners, interact with the educator, keep up with verbal explanations, keep still throughout the lesson, concentrate solidly with no chance of a break, then lots more interaction followed by finding my way out and back home again! And all of this in exchange for learning something which I could understand much more quickly and easily if I just read written/visual information alone and in my own time.

I can understand the appeal of a social situation involving a certain subject, but not when I’m learning the subject. For me, those two things have to happen separately in order to be efficient or enjoyable. If I’m in a situation which has both, I have to just pick one to focus on (generally the learning), and I still find it much harder because I’m distracted by the other element (i.e., the people socialising around me).

I’m starting a distance-learning degree soon. It will be an interesting experience, because it seems like it will be the perfect learning style for me. But I’m wary of getting my hopes up too much. Maybe I actually need something that’s in-between traditional classroom learning and completely solitary learning? I guess I’ll find out.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s